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Ego's County

2016  :  42 x 52 cm  :  Cotton thread on cotton calico and muslin

 

Immortality isn't always everlasting life; for most people lasting life is granted in the legacies we leave behind. Traditionally these legacies are work-related, which have historically excluded the crucial domestic work of women in raising successful and, more importantly, happy and fulfilled descendants, at the expense of the immortality of their own names. While women continue to (slowly) move into high-performance work, with the opportunity to make a mark on traditional historical narratives for themselves, maybe it's time we re-examined what it is that constitutes living on, question what we want to be remembered for, and ask why anyone would want to be immortal anyway.

This piece takes its name from the poem Conscript (for James Ballard Sutton) by Philip Larkin

 

Part of REMOH

REMOH is a project stemming from a lifelong interest in Ancient Greek mythology. Using the often overlooked female characters from these stories, new interpretations are put forward, pondering modern female identity, relationships and sexuality.

Ego's County is inspired by the Hesperides; the nymphs of the setting sun. They tended the garden where the immortality-granting golden apples grew, which Heracles stole during his labours. In their grief they were turned into trees... because that's how we do it.